The Intake

Insights for those starting, managing, and growing independent healthcare practices

ICD-10 Code E29.1

What is the code E29.1? ICD-10-CM code E29.1 refers to “Testicular hypofunction,” and more commonly hypotestosteronism. This code is used to classify a condition characterized by the underproduction of hormones by the testes. Detailed description of E29.1 Testicular hypofunction, represented by ICD-10-CM code E29.1, is a condition in which the testes fail to produce sufficient […]

What is the code E29.1?

ICD-10-CM code E29.1 refers to "Testicular hypofunction," and more commonly hypotestosteronism. This code is used to classify a condition characterized by the underproduction of hormones by the testes.

Detailed description of E29.1

Testicular hypofunction, represented by ICD-10-CM code E29.1, is a condition in which the testes fail to produce sufficient amounts of hormones, particularly testosterone. This condition can lead to various symptoms and may impact a patient's overall health and well-being. It is often associated with hormonal imbalances and can affect sexual development, fertility, and secondary sexual characteristics.

Symptoms commonly associated with E29.1

Common symptoms associated with testicular hypofunction (E29.1) include:

  • Reduced libido
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Infertility
  • Decreased muscle mass
  • Fatigue
  • Depression
  • Osteoporosis
  • Gynecomastia (enlargement of breast tissue in males)
  • Delayed puberty in adolescents

Related and similar ICD-10-CM codes to E29.1 include:

  • E29.0: Testicular hyperfunction
  • E29.8: Other testicular dysfunction
  • E29.9: Testicular dysfunction, unspecified
  • E34.50: Androgen insensitivity syndrome

Appropriate usage of E29.1 for billing

The appropriate usage of ICD-10-CM code E29.1 for billing purposes involves ensuring that the diagnosis of testicular hypofunction is documented by the provider in the assessment portion of the note.. This code should be used when the primary reason for the patient's visit or treatment is related to the underproduction of hormones by the testes.

Instructional guidelines for coding E29.1

When coding for testicular hypofunction (E29.1), it is important to:

  • E29.1 excludes post-procedural hypotestosteronism, (E89.5).
  • Use additional codes to identify any associated conditions or complications, such as infertility or osteoporosis that are documented in the assessment portion of the note.
  • Follow payer-specific guidelines and requirements for coding and billing including required gender markers.

Additional instructional notes for E29.1 include:

  • Use additional codes to identify any manifestations of the condition, such as osteoporosis (M81.0) or gynecomastia (N62) when the provider includes them in the assessment portion of the note.
  • Follow any specific payer guidelines for coding and billing endocrine disorders.

Common pitfalls in coding with E29.1

  • Failure to include additional relevant codes for associated conditions.
  • Misclassification of symptoms that may be related to other endocrine disorders.
  • Overlooking payer-specific coding guidelines and policies.

Key resources for E29.1 coding

  • CMS ICD-10 Homepage: Provides official resources and guidelines on ICD-10-CM coding.
  • WHO ICD-10 Online Browser: Useful for verifying the definitions and relationships between different ICD-10-CM codes.
  • Professional coding associations such as AAPC (American Academy of Professional Coders) and AHIMA (American Health Information Management Association)
  • Endocrinology clinical guidelines and publications

Conclusion

ICD-10-CM code E29.1, representing testicular hypofunction, is used to classify a condition where the testes underproduce hormones, particularly testosterone. Proper documentation and adherence to coding guidelines are important considerations for accurate billing and patient care management. By understanding the symptoms, related codes, and best practices, healthcare providers can ensure accurate and efficient coding for this condition.

Subscribe to The Intake:
A weekly check-up for your independent practice